Event Title

Analysis of Unemployment Rate by U.S. Presidential Political Party Based on Historical Data (1949 - 2016)

Location

SRC 2000 Room E

Event Type

Presentation

Start Date

10-5-2019 11:05 AM

End Date

10-5-2019 12:05 PM

Description

My research paper is an analysis of the unemployment rate by U.S. Presidential Political Party based on historical data from 1949 – 2016. Research is based on the average unemployment rate per four-year presidential term (four full calendar years). My theory was that Democrats are more effective in managing unemployment than Republicans during their respective four-year presidential terms. I used various sources focused on unemployment, political science, sociology, and economics. Exploring each of these subjects and how they affect unemployment continued to build support for my theory. Democrats and Republicans have different views when it comes to managing unemployment. When researching their political views and policies [search terms such as civil and income equality, balancing the budget, government regulations, and “Trickle-down economics”] and their effects, the pattern during this study was that Democrats (8 terms) over the course of the 68 years have proven to be more efficient in effectively managing unemployment than Republicans (9 terms), even when inheriting a high unemployment rate from a prior political party (i.e. The Great Recession from 2008 – 2009).

Faculty Supervisor: Dejang Liu

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May 10th, 11:05 AM May 10th, 12:05 PM

Analysis of Unemployment Rate by U.S. Presidential Political Party Based on Historical Data (1949 - 2016)

SRC 2000 Room E

My research paper is an analysis of the unemployment rate by U.S. Presidential Political Party based on historical data from 1949 – 2016. Research is based on the average unemployment rate per four-year presidential term (four full calendar years). My theory was that Democrats are more effective in managing unemployment than Republicans during their respective four-year presidential terms. I used various sources focused on unemployment, political science, sociology, and economics. Exploring each of these subjects and how they affect unemployment continued to build support for my theory. Democrats and Republicans have different views when it comes to managing unemployment. When researching their political views and policies [search terms such as civil and income equality, balancing the budget, government regulations, and “Trickle-down economics”] and their effects, the pattern during this study was that Democrats (8 terms) over the course of the 68 years have proven to be more efficient in effectively managing unemployment than Republicans (9 terms), even when inheriting a high unemployment rate from a prior political party (i.e. The Great Recession from 2008 – 2009).

Faculty Supervisor: Dejang Liu