Event Title

Fighting the Rise of the Anti-Vaccination Movement

Presenter Information

Savannah Santos, College of DuPage

Location

SRC 2000 Room E

Event Type

Presentation

Start Date

10-5-2019 9:25 AM

End Date

10-5-2019 10:25 AM

Description

A growing movement against vaccines has been gaining traction all around the world, and we are starting to hear about it more than ever before. Those who oppose vaccinating their children, who many call anti-vaxxers, believe that vaccines ultimately cause more harm than good. For example, the unfounded conviction that MMR vaccines cause autism in children. This research project addresses the rise, motivations and consequences of the anti-vaxx movement. The choice not to vaccinate has caused a cascade of outbreaks throughout the United States. Legislative efforts have begun the fight against this dangerous movement, but these methods aren’t enough to fully combat the issue. Due to research involving anti-vaxxers’ unbreakable faith in conspiracy theories, often promoted through social media, we need to expand our existing efforts for the sake of public health and safety.

Faculty Supervisor: Sarah Magin

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May 10th, 9:25 AM May 10th, 10:25 AM

Fighting the Rise of the Anti-Vaccination Movement

SRC 2000 Room E

A growing movement against vaccines has been gaining traction all around the world, and we are starting to hear about it more than ever before. Those who oppose vaccinating their children, who many call anti-vaxxers, believe that vaccines ultimately cause more harm than good. For example, the unfounded conviction that MMR vaccines cause autism in children. This research project addresses the rise, motivations and consequences of the anti-vaxx movement. The choice not to vaccinate has caused a cascade of outbreaks throughout the United States. Legislative efforts have begun the fight against this dangerous movement, but these methods aren’t enough to fully combat the issue. Due to research involving anti-vaxxers’ unbreakable faith in conspiracy theories, often promoted through social media, we need to expand our existing efforts for the sake of public health and safety.

Faculty Supervisor: Sarah Magin